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Benefits of Transforming Care After Treatment project brought into sharp focus

Published: Tuesday, 08 May 2018

Benefits of Transforming Care After Treatment project brought into sharp focus

A partnership project involving staff from SLH&SCP has helped transform the way people affected by cancer are supported.

The aim of Scotland-wide Transforming Care After Treatment (TCAT) project - which also involved key partners Macmillan Cancer Support and Health and Social Care North Lanarkshire - was to test the role that a planning process and individual budget would play in supporting people living with and beyond cancer.
After a series of planning sessions which recognised that those with a cancer diagnosis are the experts in their own care, a provision of a £250 budget was given to each participant for them to spend on what they thought would have a positive impact on their life.
People used their own budget for a variety of things from improving their health and fitness to buying driving lessons.
The project is part of the TCAT programme which is testing and spreading new ways of supporting people with cancer through £5 million worth of funding in partnership with the Scottish Government, the NHS and local authorities across the country. It’s made up of 25 unique projects within the NHS and local authorities in Scotland.
At an event at Bellshill marking the end of the project, Project Lead, Kathie Coonagh said:“The sense of isolation at the end of treatment can leave many feeling helpless. The project developed a person-centred approach that supported people to think about what would make a positive difference to their life after treatment. It has given people who have had a cancer diagnosis an opportunity to think about their experiences and to take control of their own care post treatment.
 “The project wasn’t just about financially supporting those with cancer but more about helping them to think about the rest of their life after treatment and what would make their life easier.
“It’s incredibly heart-warming to see this project and that just a small budget of £250 can have such a positive impact on those who took part.”
Macmillan National Programme Manager, Gordon McLean said: “At its core, this project was about helping those with a cancer diagnosis take control of their life after treatment. Empowering people who have had a cancer diagnosis is one of the main aims of the wider national project.
“In Scotland, the cancer care system is facing an unprecedented challenge in giving people with cancer the emotional, practical and financial support they need.
“It’s vital the cancer care system adapts to meet the challenges we face supporting the ever-increasing number of people with cancer and it is projects like this that show the amazing outcomes that innovative, personal and non-clinical approach to care can have.”